Remembering Easton’s Lost Sons

It is fair to say that US senator Daniel Inouye, a decorated World War II veteran, was not a fan of the Memorial Day weekend.  For almost a quarter century, the legislator from Hawaii fought to have this national holiday reverted to its original date of May 30th as opposed to our Continue reading “Remembering Easton’s Lost Sons”

Digitizing History: A Real Page-Turner

Eli Adams Ledger Index, 1815-1817. (Historical Society of Easton, 70.1.Jan 15)

This January, the Historical Society of Easton purchased an overhead scanner to digitize our bound archives. We thank each donor who contributed and in gratitude, we will be posting updates on our progress. Continue reading “Digitizing History: A Real Page-Turner”

Pioneers of Liberty: Easton’s Soldiers in Connecticut’s 29th Colored Regiment

At the edge of the New Haven harbor in Fair Haven sits Criscuolo Park. Sports fields and playgrounds now occupy what was once a bustling port area where the Quinnipiac and Mill Rivers meet. While there is no trace of the Civil War training camp that existed at this spot, since 2008, Continue reading “Pioneers of Liberty: Easton’s Soldiers in Connecticut’s 29th Colored Regiment”

Local Land Dispute Leads to Lawsuit

A portion of a 55-acre plot of farmland on Banks Road is the subject of a lawsuit that pits an Easton resident against a limited liability company linked to the chairman of the Planning and Zoning Commission.

Daniel Lent of Banks Road filed a lawsuit in Bridgeport Superior Court Continue reading “Local Land Dispute Leads to Lawsuit”

Observing Martin Luther King Jr. Day of Service in the Pandemic

The Martin Luther King Jr. holiday is the only federal holiday designated as a national day of service to encourage all Americans to volunteer to improve their communities. Celebrated the third Monday in January to honor the achievements of Martin Luther King, Jr., this year’s celebration Continue reading “Observing Martin Luther King Jr. Day of Service in the Pandemic”

Constant Gardeners: the Founding of the Easton Garden Club

In June 1939, five Easton ladies were selected by the Federated Garden Clubs to represent Connecticut at the newly opened Gardens on Parade at the World’s Fair in New York.  Mrs. Katherine Rauschkolb, Mrs. Edith Duff, Mrs. Lillian Shook, Mrs. Rose Coon and Miss Esther Foote served Continue reading “Constant Gardeners: the Founding of the Easton Garden Club”

Louise Bourgeois: Ma Maison à Easton

The neatly ordered jars set in the oak cupboard were a great comfort to Louise Bourgeois in the summer of 1942.  Food rationing had begun that same year as the Second World War heavily burdened US supply chains. Government posters encouraged women to preserve local harvests and help Continue reading “Louise Bourgeois: Ma Maison à Easton”

Edna Ferber, Giant, & James Dean

Part of the Easton Historical Society’s Year of the Woman series.

Edna Ferber’s Treasure Hill estate on Maple Road in Easton was her country home from 1939 until 1952. It was here where she penned most of her novel, Giant. Released in 1952, the book became a lightning rod for criticism Continue reading “Edna Ferber, Giant, & James Dean”

Black Thunder

I was probably about twelve years of age when I was told the story about my three-times great uncle, Birdsey Wade. The storyteller was George Faverau, a hired hand employed for as long as I could remember by my maternal grandparents. George was the oldest man I’d ever met from Easton, Continue reading “Black Thunder”

‘I have been in Eden’ – Helen Keller’s visit to Mark Twain’s Stormfield in 1909

Part of the Historical Society of Easton’s Year of the Woman series.

In March of 1894, fourteen-year-old Helen Keller met Samuel Clemens for the first time at a gathering at Laurence Hutton’s New York home. Hutton was the literary editor of Harper’s Magazine at the time. After Continue reading “‘I have been in Eden’ – Helen Keller’s visit to Mark Twain’s Stormfield in 1909”

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