Remembering Easton’s Lost Sons

It is fair to say that US senator Daniel Inouye, a decorated World War II veteran, was not a fan of the Memorial Day weekend.  For almost a quarter century, the legislator from Hawaii fought to have this national holiday reverted to its original date of May 30th as opposed to our Continue reading “Remembering Easton’s Lost Sons”

Digitizing History: A Real Page-Turner

Eli Adams Ledger Index, 1815-1817. (Historical Society of Easton, 70.1.Jan 15)

This January, the Historical Society of Easton purchased an overhead scanner to digitize our bound archives. We thank each donor who contributed and in gratitude, we will be posting updates on our progress. Continue reading “Digitizing History: A Real Page-Turner”

Pioneers of Liberty: Easton’s Soldiers in Connecticut’s 29th Colored Regiment

At the edge of the New Haven harbor in Fair Haven sits Criscuolo Park. Sports fields and playgrounds now occupy what was once a bustling port area where the Quinnipiac and Mill Rivers meet. While there is no trace of the Civil War training camp that existed at this spot, since 2008, Continue reading “Pioneers of Liberty: Easton’s Soldiers in Connecticut’s 29th Colored Regiment”

Constant Gardeners: the Founding of the Easton Garden Club

In June 1939, five Easton ladies were selected by the Federated Garden Clubs to represent Connecticut at the newly opened Gardens on Parade at the World’s Fair in New York.  Mrs. Katherine Rauschkolb, Mrs. Edith Duff, Mrs. Lillian Shook, Mrs. Rose Coon and Miss Esther Foote served Continue reading “Constant Gardeners: the Founding of the Easton Garden Club”

Louise Bourgeois: Ma Maison à Easton

The neatly ordered jars set in the oak cupboard were a great comfort to Louise Bourgeois in the summer of 1942.  Food rationing had begun that same year as the Second World War heavily burdened US supply chains. Government posters encouraged women to preserve local harvests and help Continue reading “Louise Bourgeois: Ma Maison à Easton”

The Peculiar Trials of Mary Staples

It was said by Lucy Pell, the surgeon’s wife, that a witch had been living among them in Fairfield.  In 1653,  she claimed she heard such words herself from the condemned Goodwife Bassett who was imprisoned and awaiting her death.  Goody Bassett was a middle class wife, hence the Continue reading “The Peculiar Trials of Mary Staples”

Buried in an Easton Swamp

The trunk buried in the Easton swamp displayed at trial with murder weapons, Daily News photo, May 30, 1921

It was early on a Monday evening when the police pulled over just off Sport Hill Road next to the Union Cemetery. There, in the overgrown wetlands, a confessed murderer claimed Continue reading “Buried in an Easton Swamp”

Easton’s Ladies in White

Union Cemetery, Easton Connecticut

Like all small colonial towns in New England, Easton has its share of ghost stories, but few can compare to the tales told about our oldest burial ground, the Union Cemetery.  Set off by stone walls and wrought iron fencing, it sits at the intersection Continue reading “Easton’s Ladies in White”

The Politics of Masking

As many of us return to work and life in our Connecticut communities, we are continuing to face a new set of social expectations regarding health and safety as Covid-19 cases subside locally. Recommended measures still include social distancing and self quarantine if exposed, and Continue reading “The Politics of Masking”

Everyday History in Easton

Easton’s 150th Anniversary Parade, September 16, 1995

This month, Easton reaches a landmark anniversary as it turns 175 years old.  As a parish that was once part of Weston, our town was settled by independent, brave and hardworking colonials who were often referred to as “outlivers” Continue reading “Everyday History in Easton”

image_pdfimage_print