Letters from Pete – Hugh Pedersen’s WWII Correspondence Home

Part Two of Hugh Pedersen’s recollections from the Second World War in the Historical Society of Easton’s continuing Series: Easton in the Service.

In a world with several methods of instant communication, it is almost hard to imagine a time when the only means of communicating Continue reading “Letters from Pete – Hugh Pedersen’s WWII Correspondence Home”

The Silver Fox – Hugh Pedersen’s Recollections of his Service during WWII

The Historical Society of Easton’s continuing Easton in the Service series.

My Son

Were he to die beneath a foeman’s hand

Loving life so, in some bleak, alien land

Help me dear God, that I may understand

Up hill or down, wherever I may tread

In peaceful ways, or under Continue reading “The Silver Fox – Hugh Pedersen’s Recollections of his Service during WWII”

Remembering Easton’s Lost Sons

It is fair to say that US senator Daniel Inouye, a decorated World War II veteran, was not a fan of the Memorial Day weekend.  For almost a quarter century, the legislator from Hawaii fought to have this national holiday reverted to its original date of May 30th as opposed to our Continue reading “Remembering Easton’s Lost Sons”

When Opportunity Knocks

This article began life as another in our series of Easton in the Service. While Brigadier General Edwin Norman Clark was born in Parkersburg, Iowa, he lived a major portion of his eighty years in Easton. And how many towns the size of Easton can boast having a United States Military Continue reading “When Opportunity Knocks”

James & Frank Nagy – Easton Brothers Gone To War

Part of the Historical Society of Easton’s year-long series: Easton in the Service.

Immigrants aboard the SS Kroonland heading from Antwerp to New York for a new and better life in the early 20th Century

It was cold and raining when a 20-year-old Hungarian by the name of Gabor Continue reading “James & Frank Nagy – Easton Brothers Gone To War”

The Laskay Boys – World War II

Part of the Historical Society of Easton’s series “Easton in the Service.”

Prior to 1917, there had only been two acts passed by congress during the entire history of the United States that regulated immigration: the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 barring Chinese immigrants from Continue reading “The Laskay Boys – World War II”

Brothers in Arms – The Halzack Boys

First of a three part series on brothers from Easton families who served at the same time in WWII.

George Halzack was born in Bayerovch, Czechoslovakia on January 1, 1894. He emigrated to the United States in 1910, and in 1913 he joined the Army where he rose to the rank of First Continue reading “Brothers in Arms – The Halzack Boys”

Pioneers of Liberty: Easton’s Soldiers in Connecticut’s 29th Colored Regiment

At the edge of the New Haven harbor in Fair Haven sits Criscuolo Park. Sports fields and playgrounds now occupy what was once a bustling port area where the Quinnipiac and Mill Rivers meet. While there is no trace of the Civil War training camp that existed at this spot, since 2008, Continue reading “Pioneers of Liberty: Easton’s Soldiers in Connecticut’s 29th Colored Regiment”

1917 – The Easton Doughboys of the First World War

Part of the Easton in the Service series presented by the Historical Society of Easton.

When we are in school, studying the history of war is an exercise in memorizing places, dates, countries, and battles. It is largely about who wins and who loses. We tend to glorify the victors Continue reading “1917 – The Easton Doughboys of the First World War”

Easton in the Service – Dr. Richard Quinton

Easton in the Service

This is the first in the Historical Society of Easton’s series on Easton in the Service. Our mission is to present multiple stories of the men and women who lived in Easton – either before, during, or after serving their country. What each of them did, who Continue reading “Easton in the Service – Dr. Richard Quinton”

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