James & Frank Nagy – Easton Brothers Gone To War

Part of the Historical Society of Easton’s year-long series: Easton in the Service.

Immigrants aboard the SS Kroonland heading from Antwerp to New York for a new and better life in the early 20th Century

It was cold and raining when a 20-year-old Hungarian by the name of Gabor Continue reading “James & Frank Nagy – Easton Brothers Gone To War”

The Laskay Boys – World War II

Part of the Historical Society of Easton’s series “Easton in the Service.”

Prior to 1917, there had only been two acts passed by congress during the entire history of the United States that regulated immigration: the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 barring Chinese immigrants from Continue reading “The Laskay Boys – World War II”

Easton in the Service – Dr. Richard Quinton

Easton in the Service

This is the first in the Historical Society of Easton’s series on Easton in the Service. Our mission is to present multiple stories of the men and women who lived in Easton – either before, during, or after serving their country. What each of them did, who Continue reading “Easton in the Service – Dr. Richard Quinton”

Constant Gardeners: the Founding of the Easton Garden Club

In June 1939, five Easton ladies were selected by the Federated Garden Clubs to represent Connecticut at the newly opened Gardens on Parade at the World’s Fair in New York.  Mrs. Katherine Rauschkolb, Mrs. Edith Duff, Mrs. Lillian Shook, Mrs. Rose Coon and Miss Esther Foote served Continue reading “Constant Gardeners: the Founding of the Easton Garden Club”

Monuments Men

One of the challenges in writing a weekly history column is constantly coming up with new ideas about old things. Today’s subject was inspired by the Getty Museum in Los Angeles which recently called on its online followers to re-create master artworks using ordinary household items. Continue reading “Monuments Men”

Women, the Workplace, and World War II

presented by the Historical Society of Easton

1943 Poster depicting Rosie the Riveter

Looking back at U.S. history, it’s almost unimaginable that women had to continuously fight for the right to vote for a full fifty years after the ratification of the 15th Amendment which had Continue reading “Women, the Workplace, and World War II”

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